International Affairs

SCI actively works in the international arena to protect the freedom to hunt and the carriage of hunting firearms worldwide.Below are just a few examples of areas where SCI is working to increase hunting access and reduce burdens worldwide.

United Nations: The UN has no less than five programs dedicated to limiting the ability to import or transport firearms. These programs would greatly increase the difficulty of traveling with firearms and could lead to a global gun control treaty. SCI is a registered non-governmental organization with the United Nations working to oppose the UN's attempt to impose a global gun control treaty. SCI sent representatives to UN meetings to oppose the Arms Trade Treaty and the UN Program of Action on Small Arms.

Convention on the International Trade of Endangered Species (CITES): CITES regulates trade in protected species of wildlife, including the shipment of hunting trophies. SCI is a leader in CITES and participated in the most recent Conference of the Parties. At the Conference SCI was successful in lobbying to relax the definition of a hunting trophy which will ease the importation of trophies that have been altered in the country where the animal was harvested.

World Forum on the Future of Sport Shooting Activities (WFSA):SCI serves on the Executive Committee of the WFSA and SCI's participation in WFSA helps magnify SCI's voice in the international community. The Forum is an educational and scientific association, founded in 1997 by over two dozen existing associations and organizations. WFSA is a pro-active advocacy organization, representing a substantial portion of the sport shooting community, working in concert with international bodies, national governments and regulatory authorities, for the worldwide promotion and preservation of sport shooting activities.

Lead Ammunition (Read about SCI's work on this topic): Currently one of the biggest threats to hunters and sport shooters in Europe is the push to ban or restrict traditional ammunition.WFSA and SCI are continually working to fight this effort in the European Union (EU).The WFSA has recently sponsored two new studies on the effects of lead ammunition and is actively opposing a new EU regulation that could greatly affect the ability of hunters and sport shooters to use traditional hunting ammunition.

Airline Transport: Some of the biggest problems for international hunters are the unnecessary burdens and regulations that impede the transport of firearms and trophies internationally. SCI works with both with airlines and governments to reduce the burdens faced by the traveling hunter.

Trophy Fees:While trophy fees are necessary to insure conservation of our wildlife resources, SCI believes that these fees need to be fair and not raised in ways that would harm the guides and outfitter members of SCI.

Board Reports

Feb 2014

SCI has long been a member of the executive committee of the World Forum on Shooting Activities (WFSA). Through our membership in WFSA, SCI has been very active in opposing United Nations firearms regulations.

SCI Partners with WFSA in South America

Latin America has been under continual threat as anti-hunting sentiment and anti-gun groups have grown in power recently. The most disturbing example of this was the recent total ban on hunting in Costa Rica.

To help counter this growing influence SCI has partnered with the World Forum on Shooting Activities to begin a pilot program to oppose new draconian gun regulations in Peru. Through this program, we expect to be able to increase our advocacy capacity in Latin America and help our chapters and affiliate organizations get organized and ready for the coming battle. This is particularly important in light of the recent legislation introduced in Argentina that would ban all hunting.

In January, Bill McGrath hosted a press conference announcing the roll out of the partnership in Latin America at the National Shooting Sports Foundation annual Shooting Hunting and Outdoor Trade (SHOT) show in Las Vegas, NV.

Aug. 2013

United Nations Arms Control

SCI has long been a member of the executive committee of the World Forum on Shooting Activities (WFSA). Through our membership in WFSA, SCI has been very active in opposing United Nations firearms regulations. While SCI has been successful to date, unfortunately we had a setback in March of this year.

U.N. Approves Arms Trade Treaty (High Alert):

On Friday March 29ththe United Nations (U.N.) had final discussions on the passage of an Arms Trade Treaty (ATT). While this treaty was widely expected to pass via consensus, it was blocked by three countries that had concerns about its effect on their sovereignty. Sadly, after the treaty was rejected, the United States reversed its longstanding position that the treaty should only pass with the consensus of all nations, and a vote on the treaty was held at the general assembly where it passed 154-3 with 23 abstentions. Safari Club International is extremely disappointed by this abrupt reversal of the U.S. position.We are very concerned that this treaty could greatly affect travelling hunters should it be domestically adopted by enough countries.

Even though the treaty was passed, in order to be ratified and take effect, the treaty must be signed by at least 50 countries. The treaty is now open for signature. Unfortunately the question is not if enough countries will sign this treaty for it to go into effect, but when. SCI will continue to fight as the UN negotiates implementing the burdensome requirements and attempt to protect hunters as much as possible. The Administration is on the brink of signing the treaty in the coming months; however the Senate will still need to ratify said treaty. SCI members have been extremely active in contacting Congress to oppose this treaty and it is vital that we not stop now. We are confident that the Senate will not ratify the treaty, however this does not stop SCI members travelling abroad from being affected. As this treaty is implemented over the next few years we will continue to update SCI members. For more information about the details about what is in the ATT please see the link to an article from our friends at the Heritage Foundation http://blog.heritage.org/2013/03/28/the-arms-trade-treaty-reactions-to-the-final-draft/

SCI Partners with WFSA in South America

Latin America has been under continual threat as anti-hunting sentiment and anti-gun groups have grown in power recently. The most disturbing example of this was the recent total ban on hunting in Costa Rica.

To help counter this growing influence SCI has partnered with the World Forum on Shooting Activities to begin a pilot program to oppose new draconian gun regulations in Peru. Through this program, we expect to be able to increase our advocacy capacity in Latin America and help our chapters and affiliate organizations get organized and ready for the coming battle. This is particularly important in light of the recent legislation introduced in Argentina that would ban all hunting.

May 2013

United Nations Arms Control

SCI has long been a member of the executive committee of the World Forum on Shooting Activities (WFSA). Through our membership in WFSA, SCI has been very active in opposing United Nations firearms regulations. While SCI has been successful to date, unfortunately we had a setback in March of this year.

U.N. Approves Arms Trade Treaty (High Alert):

On Friday March 29th the United Nations (U.N.) had final discussions on the passage of an Arms Trade Treaty (ATT). While this treaty was widely expected to pass via consensus, it was blocked by three countries that had concerns about its effect on their sovereignty. Sadly, after the treaty was rejected, the United States reversed its longstanding position that the treaty should only pass with the consensus of all nations, and a vote on the treaty was held at the general assembly where it passed 154-3 with 23 abstentions. Safari Club International is extremely disappointed by this abrupt reversal of the U.S. position.We are very concerned that this treaty could greatly affect travelling hunters should it be domestically adopted by enough countries.

Even though the treaty was passed, in order to be ratified and take effect, the treaty must be signed by at least 50 countries. The treaty will be open for signature on June 3rd. Unfortunately the question is not if enough countries will sign this treaty for it to go into effect, but when. SCI will continue to fight as the UN negotiates implementing the burdensome requirements and attempt to protect hunters as much as possible. We expect the Administration to review the treaty over the next 6-12 months to determine whether the U.S. should sign it. SCI members have been extremely active in contacting Congress to oppose this treaty and it is vital that we not stop now. Help SCI fight this international encroachment on your freedoms by joining us in Washington, DC on May 9thto lobby the U.S. Members of Congress. Don't wait until the Obama Administration undermines all hunters worldwide. For more information about the details about what is in the ATT please see the link to an article from our friends at the Heritage Foundation http://blog.heritage.org/2013/03/28/the-arms-trade-treaty-reactions-to-the-final-draft/

International Small Arms Control Standards

Another threat that continues is called the International Small Arms Control Standards (ISACS). This program is what most WFSA members are most concerned about as they believe that it could use technical measures such as caliber as a way to control small arms. Two WFSA members were serving as advisors to ISACS so that they could provide input from the firearm owner and manufacturer perspective, but due to the flawed process they pulled out of the negotiations.

Programme of Action

Lastly, the "Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects" continues to be a problem. This working group is tasked with preventing the trade in illicit weapons, however they often fail to recognize the legitimate firearms trade and recommend onerous marking requirements around the world. This group meets every other year and the next meeting is this year.

Jan. 2013

United Nations Arms Control

SCI has long been a member of the World Forum on Shooting Activities (WFSA). Through our membership in WFSA, SCI has been very active in opposing United Nations firearms regulations. While SCI has been successful to date, there are numerous programs listed below that continue to threaten hunters and gun owners.

Firearms Protocol

The 6thSession "Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Convention against Transnational Crime", was held in Vienna, Austria from October 15-19, 2012." About six representatives from WFSA were at the event to oppose expansion of the Firearms Protocol. SCI has worked on this issue in the past including by providing draft language that would simplify procedures for hunters and shooters who are only temporarily importing firearms.

Arms Trade Treaty

The Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) would require UN reporting and tracking of all conventional weapons trade. While the scope of the treaty is not decided at this point it could be everything from battleships to bullets. Intense negotiations on the in July of 2012 and luckily at the last minute the United States pulled out of negotiations. SCI submitted comments on the draft treaty through WFSA and it is likely that the heavy lobbying pressure that was pushed by WFSA, NRA and others helped convince the US to punt the process until post-election. This is likely and election year gimmick and we fully expect the ATT to return as a threat next year.

International Small Arms Control Standards

Another threat that continues is called the International Small Arms Control Standards (ISACS). This program is what most WFSA members are most concerned about as they believe that it could use technical measures such as caliber as a way to control small arms. Two WFSA members were serving as advisors to ISACS so that they could provide input from the firearm owner and manufacturer perspective, but due to the flawed process they pulled out of the negotiations.

Programme of Action

Lastly, the "Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects" continues to be a problem. This working group is tasked with preventing the trade in illicit weapons, however they often fail to recognize the legitimate firearms trade and recommend onerous marking requirements around the world. This group meets every other year and the next meeting is in 2013.

The frequency at which people began following us on Facebook was the highest it's been all year.

Safari Club International » Advocacy